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Open Agricultural Burning

India, the world's second-largest agrarian economy, creates a considerable amount of agricultural waste, including crop residues, due to year-round crop farming. The agricultural industry contributes significantly to India's overall economic growth. In the lack of suitable sustainable management measures, roughly 92 metric tons of crop waste are burned in India each year, generating significant particulate matter emissions and air pollution. Crop residue burning has become a major environmental issue, creating health problems and contributing to global warming. Composting, biochar generation, and mechanization are some effective sustainable approaches that can help to mitigate the problem while maintaining the nutrients found in agricultural residue in the soil.

When it comes to agricultural product consumption, India is far ahead of other countries. As we consider this an accomplishment or a blessing, there is a profound dark influence and consequences to this sector.

Farmers in various regions of India burn farmed fields to clear stubble, weeds, and waste before planting a fresh crop. While this method is quick and inexpensive, it is highly unsustainable since it produces significant amounts of the particulate pollutant black carbon and lowers soil fertility.

Many farmers are aware of the dangers of open burning but lack the means and knowledge to implement alternative approaches. The Agriculture Initiative of the Climate and Clean Air Coalition funds regional networks and projects that promote the use of open-burning alternatives.


 



Challenges faced:


The environmental and human costs of agricultural open burning outweigh the short-term economic benefits for farmers by a large margin. Open burning is the single largest source of black carbon, a short-lived climate pollutant that contributes to air pollution, climate change, and enhanced melting in the cryosphere, accounting for more than a third of all black carbon emissions (regions of snow and ice). After cookstoves, open burning is one of the leading causes of air pollution-related diseases and mortality. Farmers' recurrent practice of open burning gets costly over time. Consecutive fires deplete the organic matter that makes soil fertile, reducing crop yields over time and increasing the demand for expensive fertilisers. Smoke and expanding flames endanger nearby people, buildings, and farms. Agriculture residues are frequently a useful resource that should be preserved. Crop stubble, when processed into pellets, can be utilised as an energy source, while the straw can be used in livestock feed or bedding.

Farmers' recurrent practice of open burning gets costly over time. Consecutive fires deplete the organic matter that makes soil fertile, reducing crop yields over time and increasing the demand for expensive fertilisers. Smoke and expanding flames endanger nearby people, buildings, and farms. Agriculture residues are frequently a useful resource that should be preserved. Crop stubble, when processed into pellets, can be utilised as an energy source, while the straw can be used in livestock feed or bedding.

The biggest repercussions are evident in the northern portion of India, where states such as Punjab, Haryana, and others produce the most agricultural produce, and we can see the results of burning crops as air pollution in Delhi and its environs.

For this reason, we need to focus on Sustainability taking into consideration a seamless blend of both natural elements and organic ones.

Usage of Bamboo, rice and beans can be proven effective for reduction of carbon footprints by almost 50%

At Nani (https://www.nanimani.com/) we offer these sustainable products at our place which are made of bamboo, rice and beans.



Bio Bamboo: Products created with Bios Bamboo bio composites trap carbon and reduce carbon footprint greatly by containing up to 50% crop waste that is rapidly regenerative - bamboo waste. Produced from 50 per cent plastic and 50 per cent crop waste.